Archive for the ‘Podcast’ Category

May 15th, 2015

Robots: Supernumerary Limbs - Transcript

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Federico Parietti, a PhD candidate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, about his research on supernumerary robotic limbs that can be used in manufacturing and for rehabilitative purposes, among other uses.

The videos below demonstrate how supernumerary limbs can be used to assist in tasks. This research was done in the same lab that Federico works in.

Federico Parietti

Federico Parietti is currently a PhD candidate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his research focuses on the design and control of wearable robots and man-machine interfaces. Previously, Parietti was a Research Associate and Visiting Scholar at Carnegie Mellon University and an International Student at ETH Zurich, in Switzerland.

 

 

 

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May 1st, 2015

Robots: bStem - Transcript

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Todd Hylton, Senior Vice President at Brain Corporation, about neuromorphic computers. They discuss the robotics development board bStem, which approximates a neuromorphic computer, as well as the eyeRover: a small balancing robot that demonstrates how the bStem can be used in mobile robots.

Todd Hylton

As Senior Vice President of Brain Corporation, Dr. Todd Hylton leads the development of business and technical strategies within the company. A scientist and co founder of a small semi-conductor equipment manufacturer, Hylton brings 25 years of experience in the semiconductor, optical communications, data storage and defense industries alongside a broad technical entrepreneurial background in research and development, small business, marketing and government programs.

 

 

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March 20th, 2015

Robots: Speech-Based Emotion Recognition

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Christina Brester, from the Siberian State Aerospace University, about her research on a method to identify emotional state from speech. This method performs speech analysis with a self-adaptive, multi-objective, genetic algorithm for feature selection and uses a neural network to classify those features. In this interview, we’ll discuss exactly what that means, as well as the implications and future of this research.

 

Christina Brester

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Christina Brester completed her bachelor’s (2012) and master’s degree (2014) at the Siberian State Aerospace University (SibSAU) in Krasnoyarsk, Russia. Her master’s thesis was on Speech-based Emotion Recognition.

Currently, Brester is a PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at SibSAU. Her research interests include evolutionary computation, neuro-evolutionary algorithms, machine learning, and speech analysis.

 

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March 6th, 2015

Robots: Artificial Neural Networks and Intelligent Information Processing - Transcript

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Kurosh Madani from the University of Paris-EST Créteil (UPEC) about neural networks. The talk begins with an overview of neural networks before discussing their possible applications.

Kurosh Madani

KuroshMadaniKurosh Madani received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from Paris-Sud University in 1990; and his DHDR Doctor Hab. degree (senior research doctorate degree) from Paris-EST Créteil University (UPEC) in 1995. From 1992 to 2000, he founded and led the Neural Networks Division research group. From 2001 to 2004, he led the Intelligence in Instrumentation and Systems Laboratory of UPEC. In 2005, he co-founded the Images, Signals, and Intelligent Systems Laboratory (LISSI) at UPEC, and headed the Intelligent Machines, and Systems research team of LISSI. Currently, he works as Chair Professor in Electrical Engineering of Senart-FB Institute of Technology at UPEC. His current research interests include complex structures and behaviors modeling; self-organizing, modular, and hybrid neural based information processing systems and their real-world and industrial applications; humanoid and collective robotics; and intelligent fault detection and diagnosis systems.

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April 6th, 2012

Robots: History and Outlook

In today’s episode we speak with two authorities in robotics, George Bekey and Rodney Brooks about the last 50 years of robotics, the ongoing robot revolution and future prospects.

George Bekey

George Bekey is one of the father of robotics. In the 1960s, he designed and built the first four-legged robot in North America. He later founded the Biomedical Engineering Department and the Robotics Research Laboratory at the University of Southern California.

His laboratory designed and built several five-fingered robot hands and developed grasping theory. Their work included a knowledge-based approach to grasping and the use of robot hands as models for prosthetic hands. He also worked with his students to develop an autonomous helicopter, study gait control in legged robots and create a walking machine governed by genetic algorithms. His experience led him to write a book on Autonomous Robots published in 2005.

A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Bekey was chosen by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to lead a 2005-2006 assessment of the state of robotics in the United States, Western Europe and the Pacific Rim. The team’s findings culminated in a report to its federal sponsors on American competitive advantages and weaknesses on the international stage.

He retired after 40 years as a full-time faculty member at USC and continues to be active in his community and in his profession. He currently serves on the advisory boards of several robotics and high-tech companies.

In this interview, we discuss the history of robotics and his vision of the future with emphasis on bio-inspiration, learning, human robot interactions and ethics.

Rodney Brooks

Rodney Brooks has been one of the main actors in the field of robotics over the past 30 years. He received degrees in pure mathematics from the Flinders University of South Australia and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1981. He held research positions at Carnegie Mellon University and MIT, and a faculty position at Stanford before joining the faculty of MIT in 1984 where his work focused on computer vision, artificial intelligence, robotics, and artificial life.

Brooks was the director of the MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (C-SAIL) Laboratory until 2007 and one of the founders of iRobot. He is currently the founder, chairman and CTO of Heartland Robotics that aims to revolutionize manufacturing and increase productivity of industries using robots that are teachable, safe and affordable.

Per was able to briefly meet with Brooks at the RobotDalen conference in Sweden. A video of Brooks’ keynote can be found below.

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