Archive for the ‘Podcast’ Category

June 6th, 2008

Robots: Cornell Racing Team and Velodyne’s LIDAR Sensor - Transcript

Our inaugural episode centers on the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge, featuring interviews with professor Daniel Huttenlocher from Team Cornell and Rick Yoder from Velodyne, a producer of LIDAR sensors used by several teams in the robot car race.

Dan Huttenlocher

Team Cornell's Robot Racing TeamDan Huttenlocher is professor of Computing, Information Science and Business at Cornell University in Ithaca New York. As the co-leader of Cornell’s racing team for the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge, he spent countless hours testing the autonomous car which finally finished among the six final automobiles capable of following California’s road code over 56 miles of a mock urban environment. With design in mind, his team of 13 students managed to discretely embed a slick black 2007 Chevy Tahoe with a Velodyne LIDAR, three IBEO 1.5D LIDARs, five 1D SICK LIDARs, five millimeter-wave radars, and four cameras. Of course, millions of data points per second don’t come for free and Cornell’s trunk is the home of 17 dual core processors.

Since a pile of impressive hardware and CPU is not enough, Team Cornell developed the artificial intelligence and control software needed to allow their robot to locally represent its location on the road and further figure out, on a more global scale, where it really was in the world. Moreover, the Cornell car also needed to localize and track other objects in the environment and ideally reason about their next moves. So, what went wrong in this little fender bender with MIT’s car (see video below)? I guess the professional human drivers during the challenge weren’t wrong, when they said that Cornell’s car drove like a human.



Velodyne LIDAR

Velodyne's LIDAR robot sensorRick Yoder is an employee at Velodyne, a new-comer in the field of LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) sensors. The HDL-64E LIDAR uses an impressive 64 stationary lasers on a base rotating at 900rpm. This sensor was specifically designed for the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge, and was used by around a third of the participating teams, although some other teams may have been turned away by the hefty $75,000USD price tag! Though not yet destined for the consumer market, Rick hints at a new series of sensors that may soon find their way into your car.

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April 25th, 2008

Talking Robots Podcast LogoTalking Robots: Neurobotic Prosthetics
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In this episode of Talking Robots we speak with Yoky Matsuoka who is the director of the Neurobotics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. Boosted by her nomination as MacArthur Fellow she has been recognized as a leader in the emerging field of neurobotics. With her team, she’s been focused on understanding how the central nervous system coordinates musculoskeletal action and how robotic technology can enhance the mobility of people with manipulation disabilities.

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February 29th, 2008

Talking Robots Podcast LogoTalking Robots: BioMicroRobots
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In this episode we interview Brad Nelson who is the Professor of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zürich. At the root of BioMicroRobotics, Nelson has designed microrobots for retinal surgery applications. Pushing the principle of “embodiment” to the extreme, he’s by embedding the intelligence of his robot within their physical body. In the end, their shape, material and physical properties allow them to interact with the environment and subsequently harvest energy, perform sensing, and navigate through the human body. Using similar principles, Nelson’s lab won the 2007 RoboCup Nanogram Competition, the first year the event was held. The goal was to use autonomous microrobots smaller than 300µm to perform a series of soccer related tasks.

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January 18th, 2008

Talking Robots Podcast LogoTalking Robots: Autonomous Robots
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In this interview we talk to Roland Siegwart who is Full Professor at the Autonomous Systems Lab at the ETH Zurich. Based on his experience with the 18 robots he’s created, he shares his know-how on autonomous robotics and the research which is being done on robot navigation/localization and mapping.

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November 23rd, 2007

Talking Robots Podcast LogoTalking Robots: Neural Darwinism and Brain-based Devices
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In this interview we talk to Nobel laureate Gerald Edelman who is director of The Neurosciences Institute in California and professor at The Scripps Research Institute. He presents his theory of Neural Darwinism and the brain-based devices that are working away to prove its consistency through demonstrations of learning and episodic memory. What’s the next big step? The implementation of conscious artifacts, thanks to the study of the underlying biological process.

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