Archive for the ‘Podcast’ Category

November 29th, 2013

Robots: Working with EOD Personnel

In this episode, AJung Moon talks to Julie Carpenter, a recent graduate of the University of Washington who interviewed 23 U.S. Military Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel to find out how they interact with everyday field robots. Julie is currently writing a book on the topic that is scheduled to be published next year.

Julie Carpenter

Julie Carpenter has received her doctoral degree in Education at the University of Washington with her dissertation titled The Quiet Professional: An investigation of U.S. Military Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel interactions with everyday field robots. She primarily studies emotional attachment issues in human-robot interaction, and how it affects user decision-making in collaborative, sometimes stressful, situations.

Find out more about Julie and her work on her website.

Holiday Robots
Like last year, we ask you to submit videos or audio related to robotics and the holidays! Content can be fictional, scientific or business oriented. We’ll be posting the material on our dedicated YouTube channel. To submit material, simply go to www.robotspodcast.com/christmas or send us your material by email to christmas@robotspodcast.com. To get in the spirit, check out the videos from previous years via the link above or on our YouTube channel. Some of these videos gathered millions of views!

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May 17th, 2013

Robots: Autonomous Lethal Weapons

In this episode, AJung talks to Peter Asaro from The New School in New York city about autonomous weapons systems. Peter tells us about the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, an international consortium of NGOs working together to ban autonomous weapons systems. You can read our full coverage on Robohub.

Peter Asaro
Peter Asaro is an Assistant Professor at The New School and an Affiliated Scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. As a Co-founder and Vice-Chair for the International Committee for Robot Arms Control founded in 2009, Peter has been thinking, talking, and writing about lethal robots for many years. Computer scientist and philosopher by training, he is one of the leading figures in roboethics urging scientists to join the Scientists’ Call to ban autonomous lethal weapons.

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July 2nd, 2010

Robots: R&D at iRobot

In this episode we look at the Research and Development (R&D) done at iRobot in the government field with lead roboticist Brian Yamauchi.

Brian Yamauchi

Brian Yamauchi is Lead Roboticisist at iRobot in Bedford, MA where he leads many of the government projects aimed at helping soldiers and first-response teams do their work.

During this interview, Yamauchi covers some of the developments done over the past 10 years, most of which are based on the PackBot robot. In particular, he’ll be telling us how they make these robots more robust and what sensors they’re using to increase autonomy, and even map out the world. One of these sensors, the ultra-wideband radar, was presented at this year’s ICRA conference in Alaska (paper).

Beyond the single PackBot, Yamauchi is now looking at how to make robots collaborate with examples in terrestrial and aerial robot team and mobile wireless transmitters for the quick deployment of communication networks.

Moreover, because many of the government robots developed at iRobot are being used in Iraq or Afghanistan, he’ll be telling us about the research in making good soldier-robot interactions and the ethics of military robots.

Finally, we’ll be learning more on the business of iRobot and the futuristic projects they’re working on such as the chembot and jambot projects that involve making soft and deformable robots (see video below).

Before working at iRobot, Yamauchi completed a PhD in Computer Science from Case Western Reserve University and worked at the Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, DC).

Poll

In this week’s episode we’ll be asking you about your take on the cross-fertilization between the military and robotics. Make sure you take the poll and debate in the comments section below or on our forum.

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Latest News:
For videos of this week’s Robots news, including the autonomous robot lifeguard and the sand swimming salamander robot, have a look at the Robots Forum.

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February 27th, 2009

Robots: Robot Ethics (Part 2)

This episode closes a two-part special looking at ethical issues in robotics. Given the broad and controversial nature of this topic, we speak with two world-renowned experts in ethics with often-opposing views. Our first guest featured on our last episode, Noel Sharkey, is Professor of Public Engagement, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at the University of Sheffield in the UK. In today’s episode we interview Ronald Arkin, the director of the Mobile Robot Lab and Associate Dean of Research at Georgia Tech in the US. Both researchers discuss issues such as military robots, robots in the society, medical robots and legal responsibilities. Their opinions on these subjects have been widely covered by the media, international organizations and academia. The interviews were recorded individually and both researchers were asked the same questions.

Ronald Arkin

Ronald Arkin is Regents’ Professor and Director of the Mobile Robot Laboratory at the Georgia Institute of Technology where he also serves as the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Computing.

By looking at a wide variety of autonomous mobile robots in his lab, either aerial, ground-based or swarming, he’s become a world renowned expert in robotics and control, authoring corner-stone textbooks such as Behavior-Based Robotics – Intelligent Robotics and Autonomous Agents (MIT Press 1998).

In the past years, Arkin has become one of the pioneers in robot ethics, tuning in at the start of discussions on Roboethics in 2004. Since then he’s written several publications on the ethics of military robots, arguing that robots in the future could be more ethical than humans on the battlefield. Embedded with a sense of ethics, or even guilt, such robots could perhaps be able to make decisions in life-death situations. His views are presented in his new book to appear in spring 2009 entitled Governing Lethal Behavior in Autonomous Robots.

Other than military robots, Arkin discusses issues such as the attachment of people to robots, and more generally, the role of robots as care-givers or workers in the society. He also touches on the subject of medical robots, or prosthetic, capable of enhancing the human being.

Finally, with so many questions raised on the ethics of robotics, we look into the entities which will be setting limits on the use of tomorrows robots as well as defining who takes the responsibly of their actions. Could the robots themselves be held responsible in the end?

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Further reading:


Latest News:

For more information and discussion on this week’s Robots news,
including a video of the Israel’s new Harop UAV, videos of the iLean and the iHop robots and more information on CMU’s new degree program visit the Robots forum!

View and post comments on this episode in the forum

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February 13th, 2009

Robots: Robot Ethics (Part 1)

In this episode we start a two-part special looking at ethical issues in robotics. Given the broad and controversial nature of this topic, we will speak with two world-renowned experts in ethics with often-opposing views. Our first guest, Noel Sharkey is Professor of Public Engagement, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at the University of Sheffield in the UK. Our second guest, which will be featured in our next episode, is Ronald Arkin, the director of the Mobile Robot Lab and Associate Dean of Research at Georgia Tech in the US. Both researchers discuss issues such as military robots, robots in the society, medical robots and legal responsibilities. Their opinions on these subjects have been widely covered by the media, international organizations and academia. The interviews were recorded individually and both researchers were asked the same questions.

Noel Sharkey

Noel Sharkey is Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at the University of Sheffield in the UK. Sharkey has been one of the pioneers of robotics from its earliest days, having moved across fields, from philosophy to engineering, psychology and AI. He’s appeared in numerous international television shows, organized robot competitions for young people around the globe, and is the editor for several major journals in robotics. Sharkey also runs his own radio show called Sound of Science, in which he tries to make science accessible to everyone.

In his additional role as Professor of Public Engagement Sharkey’s job is to inform politicians, various public bodies and national and international organisations about ethical problems that may arise in robotics. He is a constant presence in international media when the topics of robotics in the military, policing, child and elderly care crop up, and has recently been interviewed in a parliamentary podcast.

Part 2 in Two Weeks

The debate on robot ethics is not over! Be sure to listen to our next episode in which we speak with Ronald Arkin who presents a very different perspective on the ethical issues in robotics.

Links:

Further reading:


Latest News:

For more information and discussion on this week’s Robots news,
including an upcoming webcast about the remote controlled beetle, sale of your robot Doppelgaenger and a video of the desktop robotic arm visit the Robots forum!

View and post comments on this episode in the forum

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